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Tuesday 05 July 2016

New Digital Models – Challenge or Opportunity?

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Chair: Sam Herbert, Client Services Director, 67 Bricks  

Sam Herbert photo

Venue: Arundel House, 13-15 Arundel Street, Temple Place, London WC2R 3DX (map)

Overview

The evolving digital landscape presents publishers with a range of challenges and opportunities in relation to their business models and products. Challenges relating to loss of sales, changes in user expectations and increasing competition are critical but there are also new opportunities to be explored. For example, the ability to upsell and cross sell, creation of new revenue streams, diversification, closer engagement with content consumers and establishing open access products. . 

With a panel of highly experienced speakers from the scholarly publishing sector, this seminar aims to:

  • Address the drivers – internal and external forces – that are forcing publishers to change.
  • Discuss and outline the issues and opportunities that publishers face, as well as get a deeper understanding of what these are and where they come from.
  • Explore options for addressing these issues and opportunities.
  • Scan the horizon – look at what is round the next corner for publishers. 

Delegates will be asked to contribute to a top 10 list of challenges and opportunities, which will be ranked and discussed during the seminar. 

The Professional Development Committee is responsible for the ALPSP seminar programme. The PDC programme directors for this seminar are Mark Hester, UK Client Development Manager, Aries Systems Corporation and Kathy Law, Senior Associate, Business Development Manager, Maverick Publishing Specialists Ltd.

Twitter    #alpspdigital

Who should attend?  

Product owners and managers, content producers (publishers), commercial managers, vendors, those involved with IT/digital/information systems in publishing spanning HSS and STEM publishers and societies. 

Programme

You can read speaker biographies here

09:30 Registration & coffee  
10:00 Introduction & welcome from the chair  
10:15 Academic Publishing: drivers for new digital business models, Genny Early, Business Solutions Director, Taylor & Francis Group, Informa UK plc
I will discuss some of the drivers for publishers seeking new business models. For most academic publishers, the subscription model with varying profit margins is a challenging business model to deliver increased revenue growth in today’s markets. Open Access revenues have grown steadily but the industry is far from flipping at scale, and the takeup is variable depending on academic discipline. Content sharing, and pirated content usage figures indicate the scale of demand for low cost/free content with ease of access; should publishers see this as threat or discovery channel? And what does it indicate for future monetization of academic content? Many publishers are seeking additional revenue stream opportunities in the research lifecycle, including tools, collaboration space and data. Publishers need to develop a more holistic view of our customer’s needs, envisioning new strategies for business models that are based on evidence from customers, and perhaps more innovation and experimentation playing a part. 
 Genny Early
10:45 175 Years of Scientific Communication Disruption - Frank Gibson, Director of Technology, Royal Society of Chemistry
The Royal Society of Chemistry has been publishing chemical knowledge since 1841. Today it’s the biggest publisher of chemical sciences research in the world. Frank will reflect on 175 years of disruption in scientific communication, and how technology is transforming the role of scientific publishers, in the context of an ever-increasing wealth of research data.
Frank Gibson photo
11:15 Coffee break  
11:30 Helga Zunde-Baker, Global Head of Production - Academic and Partner Journals, SpringerNature
The gauntlet was thrown down: “we need to publish scholarly monographs in six weeks or less – make it happen!” and we did. In the process we questioned and validated everything we thought we knew about books and journals publishing, and came up with something completely new. In this talk I will walk through the Palgrave Pivot development process, and along the way give some insights into production innovation in a constantly-changing marketplace.
 Helga Zunde-Baker photo - Copy
12:00 Unlocking the value of standards - Simon Powell, Director, Product Management, BSI
In this presentation, Simon will discuss how BSI, as the UK’s National Standards Body, is working to find new ways and new models to maximise the value to industry of the standards it creates and publishes. As the world of standards becomes more complex and the commercial environment more challenging, BSI is using its unique assets (and tackling unique challenges) to transform its operations,  sustain relevance, increase engagement in standards making and improve connectivity and discoverability in the compliance and regulatory space. 
 Simon Powell headshot2
12:30 Lunch break  
13:30 From Stakeholders to Shareholders: Why Language Matters – Dr Frances Pinter, CEO Manchester University Press and Founder, Knowledge Unlatched
Everyone is grappling with Open Access business models – made possible because of digital affordances, but not yet commonplace.  Funders, government bodies, learned societies, libraries, universities, publishers and authors are all testing the waters. In this session we’ll take a look at how the language used to describe new initiatives can make or break a business model. The case study comes from Knowledge Unlatched – one of the new experiments achieving sustainable OA publishing for scholarly books.
Frances Pinter1Full
14:00 Metrics and Platforms and Preprints Oh my! - Mark Patterson, Executive Director, eLife 
There is a wide and expanding range of options for scientists to share their ideas, opinions and findings. But in most people’s eyes the only channel that ‘counts’ is still the peer-reviewed journal article. This talk will explore the increasing opportunities for communication throughout the research life cycle, some of the forces that might be challenging the primacy of the journal article, and how these changes could lead to a more transparent and collaborative culture in science.
 Mark Patterson (9)
14:30 Coffee break  
14:45 New Digital Resources for Research and Teaching: A case study of video - Karen Phillips, Editorial Director, Sage Publishing
Karen will talk about horizon scanning as a source of clues to both continuities and changes in research and teaching; and suggest sources that give indicators of what will come next for publishing. She will share some of the research she has done at SAGE looking at changes in the production, purchasing, and usage of education video and how they have used this as a basis for investing in educational video as a growing medium for both scholarly communication and teaching in Higher Education. SAGE has launched 6 subject collections of streaming video as it predicts video to become an increasingly essential resource for teaching within Higher Education.
 Karen Phillips
15:15 Wrap-up and closing remarks from the Chair  
15:45 Drinks and networking  

For further information please contact:

Sabia Morrison  E: info@alpsp.org  T: +44 (0)1442 864563

Registration fees (including lunch)

ALPSP Member: £205.00 excl VAT (£246.00 incl VAT @ 20%);
Academic: £230.00 excl VAT (£276.00 incl VAT @ 20%);
Non-Member: £340.00 excl VAT (£408.00 incl VAT @ 20%)
Payment may be made by credit/debit card or you may request an invoice

How to book
Please note that you will need to log in to your account or register a new account to book a place on this seminar. If you have any questions about this please email Sabia Morrison or any of the ALPSP team.

1607NDM 

Upcoming Dates for this event

  • Tue 05 Jul 2016
  • Tue 05 Jul 2016
  • Arundel House, ,